Heatstroke Prevention and Summer Safety

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Phew!  It’s hot outside!  While humans sweat to cool off, a pet’s fur prevents sweating, thereby trapping heat which causes a rapid rise in internal temperature.  Heatstroke can occur when a pet’s internal temperature rises just a few degrees, and can cause serious problems and/or death.  While we have heard not to leave pets in a car on a hot day, there are several other situations which can cause heatstroke in any kind of pet.  Do you know the signs and symptoms, as well as some emergency first aid to help if heatstroke occurs?

Your pet relies on YOU!
Keep them safe in the heat of summer!

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If you believe an animal is being cruelly treated…

REPORT CRUELTY

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The Houston SPCA has nine full-time, highly-trained animal cruelty investigators and responds to over 7,000 cases primarily in Harris, Brazoria, Chambers, Fort Bend, Galveston, Liberty, Montgomery and Waller counties. If you believe an animal is being cruelly treated, please contact us and complete the Online Animal Cruelty Report or call 713-869-7722.

Accurate information is critical to our response. You can help us by providing the following information:

  • Nearest major intersection.
  • Suspect address, city, zip code and county.
  • Apartment complex name or subdivision name.
  • Major concern (lack of food, water, shelter, no medical attention, etc.).
  • Animal species, breed, color, number of animals on the property and their location.
  • Your contact information if we have any questions about the report.

What is animal cruelty? Penal Code Sec. 42.09.- 42.105.

To report animal cruelty, complete the Online Animal Cruelty Report or call 713-869-7722.

If the county or state you’re contacting us about is outside our jurisdiction, please contact the animal control organization, animal shelter or local law enforcement agency for that area. We cannot respond outside our jurisdiction unless requested by law enforcement.

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Has Your Vet Recommended Glucosamine?

If she hasn’t yet, your vet may recommend glucosamine to support your dog’s joints… and she likely has a supplement or two to sell you.

The good news is, she’s right …  glucosamine is something a lot of dogs could use a boost of, especially as they age.  You see, your dog’s body naturally produces glucosamine that helps support his joints.  But as your dog ages, the body produces less glucosamine, which results in stiff joints and the possibility of losing mobility.

Now, you can give your dog vet recommended supplementsbut fair warning…

A. They can be super expensive and

B. They are usually synthetic, and synthetic supplements usually only work for a short time.

If you’re not thrilled about handing out $$$ to support your dog’s joints, then you’ll want to read this article to learn about:

  • Foods to give your dog that are already rich in glucosamine
  • Why glucosamine in kibble isn’t enough
  • What other parts of the body glucosamine supports
  • Three common forms of glucosamine supplements and what you need to know about them

Click here to read the article >>

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Don’t Let Your Pet Slurp This Holiday Favorite – Only Bad Consequences Result

Unfortunately, July 5 is the busiest day of the year for animal shelters simply because so many pets panic at the sound of fireworks, escape through an open door or window and disappear into the night. Many turn up miles from home frightened, disoriented, dehydrated and sometimes injured. Others are lost forever.

That’s why each year I take a few minutes to remind everyone to consider the needs of furry family members during Fourth of July activities. There are a number of hazards you can easily avoid or at least be aware of to insure the safety and health of your pet today.

Dos and Don’ts for July 4

1. DO ID your pet. In the event your dog or kitty is lost during all the confusion and commotion of holiday get-togethers, make sure she can be identified with an up-to-date ID collar or tag, permanent tattoo or microchip.

2. DO keep party and barbeque foods out of reach of your pet. Feed your dog or cat his regular diet for the holiday, and be especially careful to secure potentially toxic people foods like chocolate, coffee, onions, grapes, raisins and bread dough. Consuming the contents of the grill grease trap is a common cause of summertime pancreatitis, especially in dogs, so make sure to keep pets away from the grill.

3. DON’T give your pet access to glow jewelry. If eaten, it can cause excessive drooling, GI irritation and potentially, intestinal blockage.

4. DO keep alcoholic drinks out of reach of your pet. Beer, wine and liquor can poison your dog or cat. Depending on how much is ingested, your pet can become very intoxicated, weak, depressed and can even slip into a coma. Severe alcohol poisoning can result in death from respiratory failure.

5. DON’T force your pet to wear a costume for July 4. Unless your dog (or even less likely, your cat) loves to play dress-up, don’t push the issue. Make sure anything you dress your pet in is comfortably loose and doesn’t restrict movement in any way. And remember it’s July — your pet can easily get overheated.

6. DO keep citronella candles, oils and insect coils out of reach of your pet. Ingestion can cause stomach irritation and potentially, central nervous system symptoms. Inhaling the oil can cause breathing difficulties and aspiration pneumonia in pets.

7. DO keep matches and lighter fluid out of reach. Some matches contain chlorate, which can damage blood cells, impair respiration and cause kidney disease. Lighter fluid can irritate your pet’s skin, and if ingested can cause GI upset and central nervous system depression. Inhaling lighter fluid can result in breathing difficulties and aspiration pneumonia.

8. DON’T allow your pet outside, especially after dark. If she’ll be within range of the sights and sounds of fireworks, try to secure her in a room without windows. Create a safe haven with bedding, a toy or two and a few treats. Turn on a TV, radio or other music to help muffle the noise from outside.

Leave someone at home with your pet if possible, but whatever you do, don’t leave her outside alone. If she becomes frightened, even a fenced yard may not keep her safe. Dogs have been injured while making panicked attempts to escape their yard, and those that succeed can run away, be hit by a car or stolen by a stranger.

Another Don’t: Fireworks and Pets

Professional fireworks displays can be stressful and frightening for pets, so I don’t recommending bringing your dog or cat along. Even normally calm dogs can get spooked and disoriented by the noise, lights and crowds involved in a fireworks display. You certainly don’t want to frighten your four-legged family member or put him in a situation where he might bolt or become aggressive due to fear.

Even pets left at home can be frightened by the loud noises that seem to go on forever the evening of July 4. Your dog or cat has a much better sense of hearing than you do, so sudden loud sounds can be especially unsettling. And this goes double if your pet is older.

If your Independence Day celebration involves backyard fireworks, make sure your pet is safe indoors well ahead of time. Lit fireworks can result in severe burns and other injuries, and unused fireworks contain potentially toxic substances like potassium nitrate and arsenic. Also be sure to pick up all fireworks debris from your backyard before letting your pet outside again.

Signs your pet is afraid of fireworks or other loud noises include shaking, vocalizing (barking or howling), excessive drooling, looking for a place to hide or escape attempts.

If your pet has a noise phobia, the time to make a stress-reduction plan is before the triggering event occurs. I recommend taking your dog out earlier in the day for some vigorous exercise or playtime to tire him out. Turn on the TV or some music to help muffle the sound of fireworks.

Natural stress solutions to consider before the fireworks begin include diffusing calming essential oils, administering flower essences or calming herbs (l-theanine, rhodiola, 5-HTP, chamomile, holy basil, GABA and ashwagandha) or giving your pet a calming TTouchmassage. With a little advance planning, you can prevent problems for your pet over the July 4 holiday. It will be much easier for you and your family to relax and enjoy the celebrations if you’re not worrying about your pet’s health and safety.

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Can summer really be happy for fearful pets?

Do you remember the fun and freedom of summer when you were a child? Maybe your family pets felt the same joy, splashing in the creek or curling up while their favorite family member daydreamed on the porch.
Unfortunately, that idyllic scenario doesn’t play out for many pets today who suffer from extreme fear of thunderstorms and fireworks, two things that come hand in hand with summer in most parts of North America.
As you know, I have dedicated the past several years and the rest of my career as a veterinarian to helping prevent and treat fear, anxiety, and stress in our pets  through the Fear Free movement. This one is personal for me, as our own dogs Quixote and Quora have come increasingly fearful of loud noises, especially fireworks, as they’ve aged.
Many people are very hesitant to ask their veterinarian for help with this problem, as they’re uncomfortable giving sedating medications to their pets. I understand this; no pet should be given unnecessary drug treatment!
But there are many things you can do that don’t involve drugs: Creating a “den” for your pet in a closet, interior bathroom, or other quiet place is one, although many pets don’t want to be off by themselves when they’re frightened. These pets need to be in contact with their humans if at all possible.
Another is a wrap such as the Thundershirt, Anxiety Wrap, or Calmz vest. You can even use a scarf. These tools can often calm mild anxiety in pets, and be used in combination with other steps to help your pet relax during stressful situations.
Then there are the “chill pills,” supplements such as Zylkene, Solliquin, Composure, Anxitane, and similar products that, when used over time, take the edge of a pet’s reactivity to stressful stimuli like loud noises and storms.
I often recommend closing the blinds or drapes, putting on the television, an audio-book, soothing music, or a fan to help mute the frightening sounds.
Contrary to what you might have heard, yes, you should comfort your pet when he’s scared! The idea that we should withhold our comfort because it will “reward” their fear is based on a complete misunderstanding of what fear is. Fear is a physical and emotional state, not a behavior. You should absolutely stay calmly, lovingly responsive to your pet, including making gentle physical contact, when he seeks this from you during a stressful event.
What you don’t want to do is make him more anxious with your anxiety. Don’t use a high voice. Don’t flutter and agonize. Stay calm yourself, and let your love and serenity communicate to him that everything is fine and you’ll keep him safe.
Finally, please don’t rule out medication. Drugs such as alprazolam (generic for Xanax), trazodone, and the new Sileo can not only calm your pet but actually help break the association between noise and the fear reaction, which can eventually make your pet less reactive to those sounds.
Don’t, however, use the drug ace promazine, also known as just “ace.” This is a sedating medication that will quiet your dog and make him less able to react to his environment — which can look to you like he’s less scared — but has no anti-anxiety effect and appears to increase, not decrease, noise phobias over time.
If you think your pet could benefit from supplements or medications, don’t wait until he needs them to get started. Talk to your veterinarian today and see if you can make summer the joyful experience for your pet is was for you as a child!
Wags, meows, and the occasional neigh,
Dr. Marty Becker,

“American’s Veterinarian”

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Recent Posts Looking For Natural Dog Dental Care? Probiotics Can HELP!

By Dana Scott

Periodontal disease is the #1 health issue plaguing dogs today. It’s estimated to affect more than 80% of adult dogs. Because periodontal disease is so prevalent, chances are your dog is affected too … even if he’s raw fed.

In today’s post, we’ll take a look at the unsuspected cause of this epidemic disease … and how new research says we might be treating it the wrong way.

What Is Dental Disease?

Once it appears, dental or periodontal disease is usually progressive and there are several stages of the disease.

Stage 1. Gingivitis

Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums (or gingiva) and is the earliest stage of periodontal disease. The pocket of the gum that surrounds the dog’s tooth contains a narrow space (called a sulcus) and plaque can begin to form there.

Plaque is a film made up of colonies of bacteria, along with special proteins from the saliva, sugars and immune cells. Bacteria are living creatures and some species can excrete by-products that can trigger an immune system response. These by-products damage the gums and will cause inflammation.

The main sign of gingivitis is a thin red line on the gums where they meet the teeth.

Stage 2. Tartar

As the bacterial populations produce more toxic by-products, inflammation will increase and start to damage the gum tissue. When this progresses, the sulcus around the tooth will become wider and deeper, allowing even more bacteria to live there.

Once the sulcus widens, plaque will move from the tooth down to the sulcus, below the gum surface. The bacteria in the plaque continues to produce by-products and trigger inflammation. This is the major driver of advanced periodontal disease.

Plaque begins to interact with minerals like calcium and phosphorus in your dog’s diet and when this happens, the film becomes hardened. This is called calculus or tartar. Like plaque, tartar will first accumulate on the teeth and then move below the gum surface as inflammation continues. The outer surface of tartar is hard and rough and plaque clings to the surface and quickly becomes mineralized, creating more tartar and more irritation to the gums or gingiva.

In this stage, you’ll see more inflammation and tartar. The gums will be red and irritated and there will likely be an odor to your dog’s breath.

Stage 3. Periodontal Disease

The accumulation of some bacteria in the plaque along the gums creates inflammation or gingivitis. If the bacteria colonies are allowed to grow, the severity of the gingivitis will increase and the bacterial colonies will continue to damage the gums. The immune response will invade the affected areas and release immune cells called cytokines, which will also damage the tissue. At this point, the bacterial toxins and cytokines can cause bone loss and there will be quite a bit of calculus around the teeth.

Once this stage is reached, the gums will bleed easily and pockets will form in the gums. There will also be obvious bad breath.

If left untreated, the gums will continue to recede from the inflammation, there will be more bone loss and the dog may have loose or missing teeth.

The longer your dog lives with dental disease, the greater the risk to his health … not just in his mouth, but in all his other organs. But before we get to that, let’s take a closer look at the bacteria in your dog’s mouth …

A Closer Look At Bacteria And Dysbiosis

Until recently, dental disease has been thought to be the accumulation of bacteria in the mouth … but this is only partly true.

Your dog consumes well over a trillion bacteria every day. Some of these bacteria will move down to the gastrointestinal tract, where they’ll take up residence or be excreted by the body. Others will take up residence in your dog’s mouth and colonize in the plaque. But the bacteria that enters your dog’s mouth are continuously seeding the bacterial colonies that live in his gut … and this population of bacteria is critical to your dog’s health and immune system.

(Related: Are The Bacterial Colonies In Your Dog’s Mouth Causing Leaky Gut?)

So if the bacterial colonies in your dog’s mouth aren’t healthy, the bacterial colonies in his gut won’t be … and your dog won’t be either.

The bacterial colonies found in plaque are extremely organized and this speaks to their importance in your dog’s mouth. Scrapings of dental plaque reveal an organized metropolis made up of tiny, organized microscopic bacteria colonies.

Collectively, these communities of bacteria and other tiny microorganisms are called a microbiome. Microbiomes are found on most body surfaces. The microbiome in the mouth is the second largest microbiome, next to the one found in the gut.

The microbiome in plaque isn’t a random population of bacteria … they all live together in organized communities. Researchers have discovered that Corynebacterium is the bacteria found right next to the tooth enamel and it grows outward from the teeth, where it networks with the next layer or colony of bacteria. Corynebacterium are packed closely together and adhere closely to the tooth and this makes them hard to remove with food or brushing.

The colonies living in the outermost layer of the microbiome are mainly made up of friendly strains of Streptococcus. These bacteria releases carbon dioxide, which helps the colonies of Streptococcus to grow.

These bacteria all live harmoniously with the body … in fact, bacteria and other microorganisms outnumber the amount of the dog’s own cells by nearly 100 to 1. When the bacteria in the microbiome are healthy, they deliver health benefits to your dog. This is called symbiosis … which means the relationship between the bacteria and your dog is symbiotic or beneficial to both. These bacteria manufacture short chain fatty acids and vitamins. They form the bulk of the immune system and they even have a direct connection to the brain, called the gut-brain axis. These bacteria are essential to your dog’s health. But not all of the bacteria living in your dog are friendly …

 

If the colonies of bacteria are disturbed, and some species die off while others take over, their influence on your dog will change. Researchers are finding that when delicate bacterial populations in microbiomes are reduced or less diverse, the risk of disease rises.

A study in cats with irritable bowel disease (IBD) showed that healthy cats had a much higher bacterial population in their gut compared to cats with IBD.

Another study found that the skin of healthy dogs was inhabited by a much more rich and diverse bacterial population than the skin of dogs with allergies.

Research is also showing that dysbiosis in the plaque, not plaque itself, is the real cause of periodontal disease. When the bacterial populations are balanced, the immune system won’t be alarmed and activated. But if the balance of bacteria becomes unbalanced, some unwanted species of bacteria can grow out of control and initiate an immune response. When the sulcus is inflamed, the cells in the gums will be deprived of oxygen and this lack of oxygen favors the growth of harmful bacteria … and once their colonies grow, they can crowd out other friendly colonies of bacteria by competing for the same nutrients and dysbiosis will occur.

If this dysbiosis isn’t repaired and balance returned to the microbiome, colonies of harmful bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis will start to destroy the tissue of the gums. Once the gums become inflamed, the immune system delivers nutrients like iron to the infected area … but these bacteria have adapted to feed on these nutrients and they start to rapidly grow out of control while the immune system continues to feed them by pumping more and more iron and other nutrients into the infected tissue.

How much damage is done depends on a few factors. Small breed dogs and brachycephalic breeds like pugs and boxers seem to be more prone to dental disease. It’s also more likely to occur in older dogs, but the immune response is critical to how quickly and how severely periodontal disease develops.

Diseases like diabetes or other health issues related to a compromised immune response (like allergies, arthritis, hypothyroidism, liver, bowel and kidney disease), will ultimately cause exaggerated inflammation in the gums and further fuel the dysbiosis.

Not only can diseases in other organs have an affect on oral health, periodontal disease can cause damage in your dog’s organs as well …

How Dental Disease Causes Other Dangerous Diseases

If the microbiome in your dog’s mouth is balanced, the bacteria colonies will be balanced and healthy and they’ll stay in their normal environment. But when the populations of some strains grow out of control, the bacteria will find it harder to compete and will migrate out of the neighborhood. Bacteria can travel from the damaged gums to the lymphatic and blood vessel systems and migrate to the body’s organs. This is called bacteremia and it’s very similar to what happens with leaky gut.

In fact the colonies of bacteria in the mouth and gut are very similar … they share 45% of the same colonies and populations. So if the bacteria in the mouth grow out of control, that dysbiosis will seed the same dysbiosis in the gut. The toxic by-products from the harmful bacteria will also cause inflammation and erosion of the cells lining the gut wall, and more bacteria and toxins will enter the body, creating a cascade of chronic inflammation that will eventually reach the organs and cause disease there.

In humans, periodontal disease has been linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, IBD and stroke. Research in dogs also shows a link to heart, liver and kidney disease.

So can you prevent this from happening by brushing your dog’s teeth?

Why Brushing And Cleaning Might Hurt …

Because most of the bacterial colonies are found in plaque, many veterinarians recommend brushing your dog’s teeth … or even a yearly veterinary dental cleaning under anesthesia.

This will clear away most of the plaque, but the bacterial populations begin to colonize immediately after plaque is removed. Studies show that about a million little organisms already cover the tooth within a minute of cleaning. And if the populations are disrupted, harmful bacteria might take hold before the friendly populations grow and crowd them out.

And you have to think about where all of that bacteria goes … you’re not getting rid of the bacteria, you’re just brushing it off his teeth and it will travel someplace else.

Think of it this way .. a mouth that is sick with unbalanced bacteria will seed the entire gut with bad bugs every day. But brushing your dog’s teeth can cause bacteremia, especially if his gums are bleeding. The bacteria will move from his mouth to his bloodstream.

In a healthy dog, the immune system can handle and clear the surge of bacteria. But if your dog is already struggling with inflammation, dysbiosis, or other chronic disease, his immune system can reach the tipping point with brushing or cleaning because it introduces so much bacteria into the bloodstream.

So let’s summarize.

  1. Plaque is a biofilm of organized bacteria and other substances. This colony lives in harmony with your dog.
  2. If this colony is wiped out with brushing, it will grow back within minutes.
  3. If the colony is disrupted, harmful bacteria will overgrow and cause inflammation. If your dog suffers from chronic inflammation (and most dogs do), the bacteria will begin to enter the bloodstream as the bacterial by-products and immune cells break down the gums.
  4. Once this happens, the bacteria in the gut will be affected, and bacteria will further infiltrate the body and migrate to the organs, where it will cause more chronic inflammation and ultimately, disease.

So maintaining the health of your dog’s mouth is critical to his health … but traditional methods like brushing might not be enough and may even cause health issues in some dogs. Dental care isn’t as simple as getting rid of plaque because there are bacteria living there that keep unwanted bugs at bay.

So let’s look at how you can protect or restore the delicate community of bacteria in your dog’s mouth …

How To Prevent Dental Disease Naturally

The first step in preventing or treating dental disease is to protect the microbiome from damage. There are several causes of dysbiosis in dogs, including:

Antibiotics: Antibiotics kill all bacteria indiscriminately and will devastate the microbiome.

Poor Diet: A processed diet that’s high in starch or sugar can fuel unfriendly bacterial colonies. Genetically modified foods or foods with pesticides can also kill bacteria and create dysbiosis.

Drugs And Chemicals: Many drugs and chemicals will harm bacteria.

Processed Diets: Most processed pet foods are completely free of bacteria. If there isn’t a stream of bacteria entering the body, the bacterial colonies will die off, causing dysbiosis. The same applies to raw foods that have undergone high pressure pasteurization. (Related: The Disturbing Cause Of Dental Disease In Dogs)

In short, you must protect your dog’s microbiome as a first line of defense. This will make sure the bacterial populations in his plaque are balanced and healthy.

But what if your dog already has some dental disease or you think his bacterial colonies have been compromised? What if your dog has allergies or other immune-related health issues?

Treating Dental Disease With Probiotics

Probiotics are friendly populations of bacteria that compete with harmful organisms for places to live and for food … and these bacteria help to balance the immune response.

And as more research is being done on the microbiome, dental research is shifting its focus there as well.

A 2009 study published in the Journal of the Canadian Dental Association found that probiotics were effective in treating and preventing dental disease. And of course, this makes perfect sense.

Probiotics will easily colonize in plaque and compete for colonization sites and food with harmful bacteria. They produce anti-bacterial by-products that discourage the colonization of harmful bacteria. They can change the pH of the mouth and the amount of oxygen and they can support the immune system.

But not all strains of probiotics are able to colonize in the mouth. The study found that Lactobacillus species of probiotics were much more likely to colonize on the teeth and in plaque than Bificobacterium species. And other studies show that the populations of some species of Lactobacillus were larger in healthy people compared to those with dental disease.

Other research found that Lactobacillus species in the mouth are capable of reducing the damaging inflammation that can cause gingivitis and periodontal disease.

So how do you get more of these friendly bug species into your dog’s mouth?

There are two ways to do this.

  1. Probiotics In His Food
    Add probiotics to your dog’s food daily. This can be in the form of probiotic-rich foods like fermented vegetables or kefir or you can give your dog a probiotic supplement (or both). Because it’s so critical to protect your dog from dysbiosis, these should be added daily.
    If you’re adding a commercial probiotic product, make sure there are more than just a few strains of bacteria and make sure there are at least 10 billion CFU (colony forming units). Remember, your dog already has a trillion bacteria entering his mouth every day so you want as many probiotics as possible to maintain or restore the balance.
    You’ll also want to be sure your dog’s food contains plenty of prebiotics, which are insoluble fiber ingredients that feed probiotics. There’s no sense in putting the bugs in your dog if you don’t feed them or they will just die off!
    And finally, steer clear of dairy-based probiotics as they can trigger allergies in many dogs.
  2. Probiotics In His Mouth
    Probiotics in your dog’s food will go a long way to restore the balance in his gut bacteria. But dogs aren’t all that great at chewing their food, so many of the bugs will just get passed right to the gut. To introduce healthy bacteria into the mouth, you can put your probiotic powder in a small spray bottle with some filtered water (chlorine will kill the bugs so don’t use unfiltered tap water) and spray it in your dog’s mouth. Then you can put the rest in his food where they’ll help seed his gut too.
    If you do this, make sure you don’t store your probiotics in water. Make a new batch right at meal time because the bacteria won’t survive long in the water.
    If you brush your dog’s teeth, make sure you spritz his mouth with this mixture afterward to encourage the growth of healthy bacteria populations.

As researchers look into the microbiome as the true source of health and immunity, we’re finding that some old treatments just don’t stand up today. The same could apply to brushing your dog’s teeth and regular dental cleanings.  But for now, try adding some probiotics to your dog’s mouth every day and you just might be able to avoid those dental cleanings altogether!

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Could your pet be your new probiotic?

Image: Could your pet be your new probiotic?

(Natural News)  If you’re considering getting a pet, here’s another reason to do so:  New research suggests that pets — dogs in particular — balance the good and bad bacteria in a home by boosting the diversity of indoor microbes.  This essentially turns them into a probiotic that boosts the immune system and positively affects gut bacteria.

Studies have found that dogs raise levels of 56 different bacterial species that can be found indoors, making the population of indoor microbes more diverse, NYTimes.com reported.  While the prospect sounds horrifying for germophobes, being exposed to bacteria from dogs can actually be beneficial for humans.

For one, exposure to animal bacteria may have a positive effect on human moods. “Exposure to animal bacteria may trigger bacteria in our gut to change how they metabolize the neurotransmitters that have an impact on mood and other mental functions,” Jack Gilbert, University of Chicago Microbiome Center Director, was quoted as saying in the report.

This could account for the anti-depressant effect that pet companionship has on humans, which was previously just attributed to the release of oxytocins.

Exposure to the bacteria brought in by dogs is also good for the immune system, particularly among kids.  The report said that children who grew up exposed to dogs are less likely to come down with autoimmune diseases such as asthma and allergies because their immune systems have been exposed to more bacteria, making them stronger.  Yale environmental engineering professor Jordan Peccia said that allergies are a sign of a poorly-calibrated, overly-sensitive immune system, one that attacks contaminants that it shouldn’t attack.  According to him, being exposed to animal micro-organisms early in life — particularly during the first three months — stimulates the immune system early on, allowing it to better distinguish between bad and good bacteria.

When dirty means healthy

Such findings align with the hygiene hypothesis, which suggests that not being exposed to enough bacteria in childhood actually weakens the body’s immune system.  The hypothesis, which was introduced in the late ’80s by immunologist David P. Strachan, was explained through a bodybuilding analogy in an article on LiveScience.com.  The article likened the immune system to bodybuilders, who build their strength by lifting increasingly heavy weights.  In the same way, the immune system has to “train” by being exposed to contaminants that they must fight off.

Many other studies support the hygiene hypothesis.  Among these is a late ’90s study by Erika von Mutius, a health researcher who, in comparing allergy and asthma rates in East and West Germany, found that children from dirtier, more polluted East Germany had less allergic reactions and asthma cases compared to those in West Germany.

Another study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that rates of asthma were lower in Amish children than in Hutterite children.  While both groups have similar genetic material and lifestyles, the Amish follow only traditional farming techniques and therefore have more contact with farm animals compared to Hutterites, who make use of modern farming methods.

Striking a healthy balance between hygiene and contaminant exposure may be tricky for parents, but it can be done.  While regular cleaning and disinfecting is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), encouraging children to play outdoors, get dirty, and interact with pets may help in strengthening their immune system.

Love dogs?  Get more dog-related news on PetHealth.com.

Sources include:
NYTimes.com
LiveScience.com
NEJM.org

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