Repel ticks with this natural oil

With summer in full bloom and more and more cases of Lyme disease being reported, many are searching for ways to repel ticks without having to resort to harsh chemicals.  Luckily, there is one sweet-smelling alternative that is proving to be quite powerful in the fight against this growing concern.

It’s summer and time to experience the great outdoors, yet many are opting out in order to avoid the feared tick bite that could possibly lead to a host of health challenges.  The good news is that something as simple and natural as rose geranium essential oil has been found to help ward off those pesky little parasites.

Ticks operate mostly by using their sense of smell.  Ticks don’t jump or fall from trees; instead, they do something called “questing.”  That is, they climb to the top of a blade of grass or plant and stick their front legs up in the air, waiting for the scent of a victim to walk by.  If you find one on your head, then it crawled there.  Their front pair of legs have what are called Haller’s organs, which detect smell, temperature, movement and carbon dioxide.  This is how they know that you are coming.  And since it is well known that they like warmth and moisture, they are waiting for a warm, moist environment to call their home.  The best part about this is that, for some reason, they are not attracted to the scent of rose geranium essential oil.

There are two varieties of rose geranium oil.  In order to get the most bang for your buck in repelling ticks, you want to find the one with the botanical name Pelargonium capitatum x radens.  The more popular rose geranium oil under the name Pelargonium graveolens is from the same family, but not the same species.

Most essential oils need to be diluted, but rose geranium does not fall into that category if used in small doses.  So, because all you need is a few drops to do the job, a little most definitely goes a long way.  Simply placing one drop on each ankle and on the wrists, then a little behind the knees and one on the back of the neck is all you will need to do the trick.  Since dogs are extremely sensitive to smell, you will want to go easy on the oil for your canine friends.  One drop behind each shoulder blade and at the top of the base of the tail.  Be careful to avoid the face and nose; their sensitive sniffers can’t handle anything too strong.

tick infested ears

Other essential oils such as lavender, lemongrass, citronella, eucalyptus, and cedar wood have all been found to be helpful in repelling these unwanted guests as well.  Please check specific directions before using to ensure safety for dilution purposes.

Whatever scent you use, take caution and remember to double-check yourself from head to toe after coming in from a summer stroll.

Note:
The essential oil of rose geranium is one single oil and not a mixture of rose and geranium oils.

Not all essential oils are recommended for animals, especially cats and horses.  Consult your veterinary doctor before using any essential oil for pets.

Also read: How to Remove a Tick

Video: How to Remove a Tick on a Dog

 

Sources include:

http://insects.about.com

About the author:
Heidi Fagley is a Holistic Nutritionist and has two culinary arts degrees – one in Raw, Living Foods and another in Natural Foods.

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under education

2 responses to “Repel ticks with this natural oil

  1. Patty

    Does anyone know where to find a retailer for this particular species of Rose Geranium oil? My precious Labrador is almost 14 years old and I can’t use poisonous insecticides on him, as his health is very fragile. Most companies selling this oil are selling oil from a different species which is questionably effective as a tick repellant. Since this product is hard to find (it’s from a plant sourced from South Africa) I don’t want to purchase something from a disreputable retailer (there are too many of those selling on the Internet!)
    Many thanks! (May 4, 2017)

Please Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s