Monthly Archives: October 2014

Post-Accidents Clean Up (pee+poop)

 

Our K-9 Angel volunteers & fosters would like to share some recommendations for cleaning up after your dog’s ‘peace and twinkles’.

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 Fizzion Pet Stain & Odor Remover

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Thieves Household Cleaner (Young Living)
Anyone who volunteers for K-9 Angels
gets a wholesale price on any Young Living product.

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Thieves Essential Oil Household Cleaner

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Cleaning with White Vinegar

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Happy Tails! – TEDDY (pka Ford)

When we fostered Ford, he was all bones and very sick.  It took almost two weeks before he felt any better. By then, we were in love and had become a family. Every day is a blessing with our Teddy Bear.  He is so playful, loves to chase the kiddos around the house and follows mama wherever she goes.
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He is the happiest when Daddy gets home.  He even lets out a little bark.  He is saying, “Daddy is home!!  It’s time to play!!”
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Thank you so much for the new member of our family!  We love him!

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If you would like to send us an update on your adopted
K-9 Angels Rescue dog, please send a short write-up and photo(s) to
happytails@k-9angelsrescue.org.   We LOVE to get updates!
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Do you want to send us updates & photos
but still need to choose the Love of your Life?
Surely you can find THE ONE right here!
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Happy Tails! – DARLING DAISY (pka Darling)

I want to sincerely thank you for allowing me to adopt Darling Daisy.  She has been a wonderful addition to our family.  She has been to our vet and groomer… not really caring for either experience.   🙂
Darling Daisy has adjusted very well and has gained 6 oz.
Enclosed are pictures of Darling and Beth (my yorkie.).  Again, thank you so very much for rescuing Darling and allowing her to join this family.
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If you would like to send us an update on your adopted
K-9 Angels Rescue dog, please send a short write-up and photo(s) to
happytails@k-9angelsrescue.org.   We LOVE to get updates!
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Do you want to send us updates & photos
but still need to choose the Love of your Life?
Surely you can find THE ONE right here!
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Happy Tails! – ALLEY (pka Wilma)

Wanted to give you an update on Wilma (Alley).  She is doing Great and is a little over two feet long.  She wanted to pose for you.  Thanks again for the wonderful addition to Our Family.
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If you would like to send us an update on your adopted
K-9 Angels Rescue dog, please send a short write-up and photo(s) to
happytails@k-9angelsrescue.org.   We LOVE to get updates!
* * * * * * *
Do you want to send us updates & photos
but still need to choose the Love of your Life?
Surely you can find THE ONE right here!
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Filed under Happy Tails

5 Tips for Keeping Your Dog Safe on Halloween

halloween pumpkin witch dog

It can be very fun for children to dress up as ghouls and goblins.  But, dogs don’t understand the concept and can be very fearful of people wearing masks and costumes.  And the huge number of children ringing the doorbell yelling “Trick or Treat” can cause excessive barking and put many dogs into sensory overload.

In my early adult years, I had a small dog with a heart murmur that had a heart attack on Halloween and died.  The constant activity was too much for him.  If I knew then what I know now, I would have kept him away from the stress of all of the noisy activity and immersed him with canine sound therapy.

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1. Keep Your Dog from Turning Into Houdini

Outside of July 4th in the U.S., Halloween is the most popular night for pets to escape their homes.  Keep your dog in a quiet back room with some soothing music playing.  Or if Buster is near the front door, make sure he’s on a leash held by another family member.  Praising and rewarding him for calm, quiet behavior is also invaluable.  It will help inspire him to choose to stay inside.  For precautionary measures, it’s best to make sure that all of your pets are wearing IDs.

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2. Keep All Candy Out of Reach Of Your Pets

Many treats can be harmful for your pets, including chocolate. Laura Cross from Vetstreet tells us, “Sugar-free candy is also a risk, as it may contain xylitol, which can cause low blood sugar and liver damage in dogs.”

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3. Watch Out for Lit Jack-O-Lanterns

While a small amount of pumpkin is healthy for dogs and cats, consuming an entire raw pumpkin can make them sick.  And, if it’s a lighted Jack-O-Lantern, you run the risk of your pet knocking it over and starting a fire.  Best to go with the battery operated ones this year.

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4. Pets in Costumes

Some dogs can tolerate wearing costumes.  But, many can’t.  If your dog wants to get out of his costume, let him.  Make sure all costumes are comfortable and that accessories or buttons are not chewable.

Gina Green Ball

5. Tire Her Out

Make sure you get your dog out for a good romp during the day and tire her out.  Frequent games of fetch along with some extra training sessions can also help  her be less reactive during the evening festivities.

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Titers Testing – Tell Me More

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Protective vaccines are an integral part of the wellness care for our dogs.  There are risks and potential repercussions to over and under vaccinating.  As a result, many pet owners and veterinarians are using blood testing/vaccination titers to help determine the need for booster vaccinations and to determine the level of protection.
Vaccine titers are the measure of the antibodies in the blood stream to a particular disease.  Each disease is tested separately.  Vaccine titer testing can be done by several different blood tests (VN-virus neutralization, HI-hemagglutination inhibition, ELISA-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay).
HI and VN are the gold standard of testing and are done only through a few labs and veterinary schools.
A protective level is considered a titer of: Distemper >= 1:32 by VN
A protective level is considered a titer of: Parvo >= 1:80 by HI
The ELISA test is considered a screening test and is more economical and more readily available.  ELISA testing has been evaluated to confirm that a positive result is equivalent to the protective titer level as measured by VN or HI.
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Titer Testing: A Crash Course
June 7 2012
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Titers: What Do They Mean?
June 2013
Comment by Will Falconer, DVM (holistic) – Austin TX
Well said, and what I’d written about years ago on alt4animals.com (updated version: http://vitalanimal.com/fallacy-of-titer-tests/).  Key take away is to not misuse the information that a titer test gives you: a low titer does NOT equal a low immunity in a multiply-vaccinated dog.  Useful if you know the limits of the test and use it judiciously.  Dangerous if you see a falling titer later in life and think, “Oh oh, Spot is no longer immune — I’d better get more vaccinations!”  It seems many respected experts in vet medicine still don’t get this point.
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Fallacy of Titer Tests
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Titer Test: Don’t Vaccinate Your Dog Unnecessarily
October 22 2008
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More On Vaccine Titers
July 11 2012
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Take the Titer Test
Be certain your veterinarian sends blood samples to a major professional veterinary laboratory such as Antech Diagnostics (www.antechdiagnostics.com), Idexx Laboratories (www.idexx.com), Vita-Tech Laboratories (www.vita-tech.com), or one of the major university veterinary laboratories, including Cornell, Colorado State, Michigan State, Tufts, and Texas A&M.
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How do you get your dog’s titers tested?

Many major labs and universities perform titer tests.  Your vet likely has a favorite lab and can draw blood and send it for testing for you.  Note: some veterinarians resist performing these tests and, as a result, charge more than the going rate at other practices.  Although titer testing may cost somewhat more than vaccination in the short run, it is a bargain long term.  Titers do not have to be repeated yearly or even every three years.  By testing rather than vaccinating, you avoid the risk of adverse reactions from unnecessary vaccines and the accompanying cost of treatment.  The more expensive rabies titer need be performed only under special circumstances (such as international travel) or to determine immunity of animals with rabies vaccination exemptions.

Large commercial and university labs perform titer testing.  Prices vary.

Jean Dodds, DVM, is a highly respected veterinary hematologist as well as a pioneer against over-vaccination.
http://www.hemopet.org/education/jean-dodds-veterinarian.html
She performs titer tests at her Hemopet lab and interprets results.
11561 Salinaz Avenue, Garden Grove, CA 92843
Phone: 714-891-2022 | Fax: 714-891-2123
hemopet@hotmail.com
The cost (subject to change without notice) is $52 for both distemper and parvo (tested together) and rabies for $98.  Add to that the cost of a blood draw from your vet and sending by mail.  Note: Most vets will send the results to any lab you specify.

Two inexpensive and quick in-clinic titer tests are now available at a growing number of practices.
VacciCheck for CDV, CPV-2, and CAV-2.  TiterCHEK®, determines antibody levels to Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) and Canine Parvovirus (CPV) in canine serum or plasma samples.  For a comparison, read what WSAVA Vaccination Guidelines Group Chariman Michael J. Day has to say about the two tests.  Both provide results in about 20 minutes.

Both test kit systems have been validated independently and correlated with gold standard tests by a number of diagnostic laboratories: the TiterCHEK® system (manufactured by Synbiotics and now owned and distributed by Pfizer) and the VacciCheck system (produced by Biogal Laboratories).  TiterCHEK® provides a yes-no (protected or not protected) answer for CDV and CPV.  VacciCheck provides a semiquantitative score for serum antibody titres against CDV, CAV and CPV.

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A Comparison of Vaccination Protocols For Dogs
by Dr. Robert L. Rogers, CritterAdvocacy, Houston TX.
E-mail: drbob@critteradvocacy.org
http://www.critteradvocacy.org/Are%20We%20Over%20Vaccinating%20Our%20Pets.htm
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The Dark Side of Pet Vaccination
http://youtu.be/2nZ5m5uzzac

 

Vaccinating Dogs: Has Your Vet Withheld the Facts?
http://youtu.be/5s4s33Spdfw

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The following information on Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory
is for reference only:

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Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory
College Station Laboratory
PO Box Drawer 3040
College Station TX  77841-3040

Phone 979.845.3414
Toll Free 888.646.5623
Fax 979.845.1794
After-hours emergency pager: 979.324.4652
If you have questions specific to client log-in services and support, please send a message to: support@tvmdl.tamu.edu.
All other questions can be addressed by calling 888.646.5623

Courier/GPS Address
1 Sippel Rd.
College Station, TX 77843
Driving DIRECTIONS to College Station Lab

Hours of Operation
Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Saturday morning specimen drop-off,  8 a.m. – 12 noon

Directions

The TVMDL College Station Lab at
1 Sippel Road
is located behind the Vet school, just off University Drive.
Driving DIRECTIONS to College Station Lab

Driving west down University Drive, go under the overpass at Wellborn Road.  At the next light, take a right onto Agronomy Road.  Take the first left off Agronomy Road into a parking lot.  Drive through this parking lot until it dead ends.  TVMDL will be the building on your right.  You may park in either of the two spaces marked “TVMDL Visitor Parking” or in one of the two spaces marked “Specimen Dropoff” in front of TVMDL.

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Keep your dog safe in the dark

ScruffTag model

  by Lindsay Stordahl

Mornings and late afternoons are getting darker and darker for many of us this time of year.  With the time change coming up, late afternoon and evening walks are only going to get darker!

You want to make sure you and your dog are visible to drivers when you’re out and about, so the following are a couple of safety tips to keep in mind this fall.

Keep your dog close

Last October I was driving home in the dark, and a neighbor’s Australian shepherd darted in front of my car as I turned a corner in the parking lot.  The owner was trailing behind on a retractable leash, totally unaware of what almost happened.  Thankfully, I was driving slowly and saw the dog in time.

I recommend ditching the retractable leash or at least keeping it locked to a shorter length.  A 6-foot leash is a much safer option when walking in the dark so you can keep your dog closer, especially around blind intersections.

Don’t assume drivers will stop in crosswalks

If you’re waiting to cross a street in the dark and a car seems to be yielding, don’t cross unless the driver actually makes eye contact and waves you across.

Use a reflective collar

Unfortunately, we can’t do a whole lot to control drivers if they’re distracted, but we can make ourselves and our pets more visible.

You probably don’t have plans to take your dog along for trick-or-treating, but maybe you’ll need to take him out for a short walk.  If you do, a reflective collar will help keep him safe on Halloween or any other evening.

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One of the benefits to a reflective product is they don’t need any batteries, so no replacing or recharging is necessary.

dogIDs carries a variety of reflective collars for dogs such as:

There are also reflective leashes available.

Carry a flashlight

When I take my dog for an evening walk, I carry a small flashlight in my pocket, which I can easily switch on to make myself more visible to drivers approaching from any direction.  This is especially important if there are no sidewalks or shoulders to walk on.

Use a light-up dog collar

Nite DawgA light-up collar will help your dog remain visible to drivers, pedestrians and even to you if you allow your dog off leash.  I especially like light-up collars for dark-colored dogs that are harder to see in the evenings, especially smaller dogs.

Even if you just let your dog outside into your own fenced yard at night, a light-up color will still make it easier to spot him.

The Nite Dawg light-up LED collar available through dogIDs has two modes – the flash mode or the steady glow mode.  You can also order the 5-foot, light-up leash.

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Filed under education, safety