Tag Archives: Firecracker

Don’t Let Your Pet Slurp This Holiday Favorite – Only Bad Consequences Result

Unfortunately, July 5 is the busiest day of the year for animal shelters simply because so many pets panic at the sound of fireworks, escape through an open door or window and disappear into the night. Many turn up miles from home frightened, disoriented, dehydrated and sometimes injured. Others are lost forever.

That’s why each year I take a few minutes to remind everyone to consider the needs of furry family members during Fourth of July activities. There are a number of hazards you can easily avoid or at least be aware of to insure the safety and health of your pet today.

Dos and Don’ts for July 4

1. DO ID your pet. In the event your dog or kitty is lost during all the confusion and commotion of holiday get-togethers, make sure she can be identified with an up-to-date ID collar or tag, permanent tattoo or microchip.

2. DO keep party and barbeque foods out of reach of your pet. Feed your dog or cat his regular diet for the holiday, and be especially careful to secure potentially toxic people foods like chocolate, coffee, onions, grapes, raisins and bread dough. Consuming the contents of the grill grease trap is a common cause of summertime pancreatitis, especially in dogs, so make sure to keep pets away from the grill.

3. DON’T give your pet access to glow jewelry. If eaten, it can cause excessive drooling, GI irritation and potentially, intestinal blockage.

4. DO keep alcoholic drinks out of reach of your pet. Beer, wine and liquor can poison your dog or cat. Depending on how much is ingested, your pet can become very intoxicated, weak, depressed and can even slip into a coma. Severe alcohol poisoning can result in death from respiratory failure.

5. DON’T force your pet to wear a costume for July 4. Unless your dog (or even less likely, your cat) loves to play dress-up, don’t push the issue. Make sure anything you dress your pet in is comfortably loose and doesn’t restrict movement in any way. And remember it’s July — your pet can easily get overheated.

6. DO keep citronella candles, oils and insect coils out of reach of your pet. Ingestion can cause stomach irritation and potentially, central nervous system symptoms. Inhaling the oil can cause breathing difficulties and aspiration pneumonia in pets.

7. DO keep matches and lighter fluid out of reach. Some matches contain chlorate, which can damage blood cells, impair respiration and cause kidney disease. Lighter fluid can irritate your pet’s skin, and if ingested can cause GI upset and central nervous system depression. Inhaling lighter fluid can result in breathing difficulties and aspiration pneumonia.

8. DON’T allow your pet outside, especially after dark. If she’ll be within range of the sights and sounds of fireworks, try to secure her in a room without windows. Create a safe haven with bedding, a toy or two and a few treats. Turn on a TV, radio or other music to help muffle the noise from outside.

Leave someone at home with your pet if possible, but whatever you do, don’t leave her outside alone. If she becomes frightened, even a fenced yard may not keep her safe. Dogs have been injured while making panicked attempts to escape their yard, and those that succeed can run away, be hit by a car or stolen by a stranger.

Another Don’t: Fireworks and Pets

Professional fireworks displays can be stressful and frightening for pets, so I don’t recommending bringing your dog or cat along. Even normally calm dogs can get spooked and disoriented by the noise, lights and crowds involved in a fireworks display. You certainly don’t want to frighten your four-legged family member or put him in a situation where he might bolt or become aggressive due to fear.

Even pets left at home can be frightened by the loud noises that seem to go on forever the evening of July 4. Your dog or cat has a much better sense of hearing than you do, so sudden loud sounds can be especially unsettling. And this goes double if your pet is older.

If your Independence Day celebration involves backyard fireworks, make sure your pet is safe indoors well ahead of time. Lit fireworks can result in severe burns and other injuries, and unused fireworks contain potentially toxic substances like potassium nitrate and arsenic. Also be sure to pick up all fireworks debris from your backyard before letting your pet outside again.

Signs your pet is afraid of fireworks or other loud noises include shaking, vocalizing (barking or howling), excessive drooling, looking for a place to hide or escape attempts.

If your pet has a noise phobia, the time to make a stress-reduction plan is before the triggering event occurs. I recommend taking your dog out earlier in the day for some vigorous exercise or playtime to tire him out. Turn on the TV or some music to help muffle the sound of fireworks.

Natural stress solutions to consider before the fireworks begin include diffusing calming essential oils, administering flower essences or calming herbs (l-theanine, rhodiola, 5-HTP, chamomile, holy basil, GABA and ashwagandha) or giving your pet a calming TTouchmassage. With a little advance planning, you can prevent problems for your pet over the July 4 holiday. It will be much easier for you and your family to relax and enjoy the celebrations if you’re not worrying about your pet’s health and safety.

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Fear of Thunder and Other Loud Noises

You can help make sounds less scary to your dog

  • Firecrackers, thunder, and other loud, out-of-nowhere sounds often leave dogs frightened and wanting to flee to a safer place.

These types of fears may develop even if your dog has had no traumatic experiences associated with the sound.  Many fear-related problems can be successfully resolved.  If left untreated, however, your dog’s fearful behavior will probably get worse.

Outlet for anxiety: destruction and escaping

The most common behavior problems associated with fear of loud noises are destruction and escaping.  When your dog becomes frightened, she tries to reduce her fear.  She may try to escape to a place where the sounds of thunder or firecrackers are less intense.  If she feels less afraid by leaving the yard or going into a certain room or area of the house, then the escape or destructive behavior is reinforced because it successfully lessens her fear.

For some dogs, just the activity or physical exertion associated with one of these behaviors may be an outlet for their anxiety.  Unfortunately, escape and/or destructive behavior can be a problem for you and could also result in physical injury to your dog.

Fear by association

Your dog may also begin to associate a particular startling noise with other things in her environment, and she may grow afraid of these other things because she associates them with the loud noise that frightens her.  For example, dogs who are afraid of thunder may later become afraid of the wind, dark clouds, and flashes of light that often precede the sound of thunder.

Dogs who do not like the sound of firecrackers may become fearful of the children who have the firecrackers or may become afraid to go in the backyard, if that’s where they usually hear the noise.

What you can do

Method 1: Create a safe place

Create a safe place for your dog to go to when she hears the noises that frighten her.  But remember, this must be a safe location from her perspective, not yours.  Notice where she goes (or tries to go) when she’s frightened.  If possible, give her access to that place.  If she’s trying to get inside the house, consider installing a dog door.  If she’s trying to get under your bed, give her access to your bedroom.

You can also create a “hidey-hole” that is dark, small, and shielded from the frightening sound as much as possible.  Encourage her to go there when you’re home and the thunder or other noise occurs.  Consider using a fan or radio near the spot to help block out the sound.  Feed her in that location and help your dog associate that spot with other “good things” happening to her there.  She must be able to come and go from this location freely.  Confining her in the “hidey-hole” when she doesn’t want to be there will only cause more problems.

The “safe place” approach may work with some dogs, but not all.  Some dogs are motivated to move and be active when frightened and “hiding out” won’t help them feel less fearful.

Method 2: Distract your dog

This method works best when your dog is just beginning to get anxious.  Encourage her to engage in any activity that captures her attention and distracts her from behaving fearfully.

Start when she first alerts you to the noise and is not yet showing a lot of fearful behavior, but is only watchful. Immediately try to interest her in doing something that she really enjoys.  Get out the tennis ball and play fetch (in an escape-proof area), or practice some commands that she knows.  Reward her with praise and treats for paying attention to the game or the commands.

As the storm or other noise builds, you may not be able to keep her attention on the activity, but it might delay the start of the fearful behavior for longer and longer each time you do it.  If you can’t keep her attention and she begins acting fearfully, stop the process.  If you continue, you may inadvertently reinforce her fearful behavior.

Method 3: Behavior modification

Behavior modification techniques are often successful in reducing fears and phobias.  The appropriate techniques are called “counter-conditioning” and “desensitization.”

These techniques must be implemented very gradually, and they condition or teach your dog to respond in non-fearful ways to sounds and other stimuli that have previously frightened her.

Be careful using behavior modification: If these techniques aren’t used correctly, they won’t be successful and could even make the problem worse.

Begin by exposing your dog to an intensity level of noise that doesn’t frighten her and pairing the noise with something pleasant, like a treat or a fun game.  Gradually increase the volume as you continue to offer her something pleasant.  Through this process, she’ll come to associate “good things” with the previously feared sound.

Example:

  • Make a tape with firecracker noises on it.
  • Play the tape at such a low volume that your dog doesn’t respond fearfully.  While the tape is playing, feed her dinner, give her a treat, or play her favorite game.
  • In your next session, play the tape a little louder while you feed her or play her favorite game.
  • Continue increasing the volume through many sessions over a period of several weeks or months.  If she displays fearful behavior at any time while the tape is playing, STOP.  Begin your next session at a lower volume, one that doesn’t produce anxiety, and proceed more slowly.

For some fears, it can be difficult to recreate the fear stimulus.  For example, thunder is accompanied by lightning, rain, and changes in barometric pressure; your dog’s fearful response may be to the combination of these things and not just the thunder.  You may need professional assistance to create and implement this kind of behavior modification program.

Consult your veterinarian

Medication may be available which can help reduce your dog’s anxiety levels for short time periods.  Your veterinarian is the only person who is qualified and licensed to prescribe medication for your dog.

Don’t attempt to give your dog any over-the-counter or prescription medication without consulting your veterinarian.  Animals don’t respond to drugs the same way people do, and a medication that may be safe for humans could be fatal to your dog.  Drug therapy alone won’t reduce fears and phobias permanently, but in extreme cases, behavior modification and medication used together might be the best approach.

What not to do

  • Do not attempt to reassure your dog when she is afraid.  This may only reinforce her fearful behavior.  If you pet, soothe, or give treats to her when she’s behaving fearfully, she may interpret this as a reward for her fearful behavior.  Instead, try to behave normally, as if you don’t notice her fearfulness.
  • Do not put your dog in a crate to prevent her from being destructive during a thunderstorm.  She’ll still be fearful when she’s in the crate and is likely to injure herself, perhaps even severely, while attempting to get out of the crate.
  • Do not punish your dog for being afraid.  Punishment will only make her more fearful.
  • Do not try to force your dog to experience or be close to the sound that frightens her.  For example, making her stay close to a group of children who are lighting firecrackers will only make her more afraid, and could cause her to become aggressive in an attempt to escape from the situation.

These approaches will fail because they won’t decrease your dog’s fear.  Merely trying to prevent her from escaping or being destructive won’t work, either.  If your dog is still afraid, she’ll continue to show that fear in whatever way she can — whether by digging, jumping, climbing, chewing, barking, or howling.  Finally, know that formal training won’t make your dog less afraid of thunder or other noises, although it could help boost her general confidence.

When all else fails

If your dog has severe fears and phobias and you’re unable to achieve success with the techniques we’ve outlined here, you should consult with an animal-behavior specialist and your veterinarian.

Adapted from material originally developed by applied animal behaviorists at the Dumb Friends League in Denver, Colo. All rights reserved.

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